Care Design 2016

Breaking down silos

I think that if you are going to do an asset review for the communiity, you need to also look at what services are being delivered in the community by other agencies, look at what role they can play, and work with them to develop systems so that you can work well together and compliment each other.

This is especially so for social care services who are so integral to the health and care system in the UK.

I'd be really interested to hear of cases where the NHS is working collaboratively with health abnd care and third sector organisations to deliver services in a coordinated and successful way.

Steve Sewell Oct 3, 2015

For me, this principle goes way beyond health, social care and voluntary sector. Although this may be the initial place to start, the following link outlines some of the work NESTA have been supporting around buidling networks in communities for health/social /voluntary sector.

https://vimeo.com/133542105

Going beyond these services in thinking about mobilising assets in a community is important, particularly as health and social care needs are closely associated with issues like employment and housing conditions. There is therefore a need to think of community assets as all public services, housing, police, fire, libraries, but also the commercial organisations, as well as formal/informal groups in communities (sports groups, coffee mornings, churches, toddler groups etc.). Stop Smoking services often tap into this wider network for example  through large employers or through particular community or religious groups. Some years ago I was involved in setting up NHS Health Checks in a Hindu temple, but this isn't an unusual initiative.

Jennifer Clemo Oct 6, 2015

I agree Steve. I also think an asset review has to take account of not just what services are out there, but how they can be utilised to co-deliver on public services. For example, in Devon, firefighters are being trained to treat heart attacks, as they may be the closest emergency service and may be able to deliver the emergency treatment faster than an ambulance - improving the chance of survival for the patients: http://www.theguardian.com/society/2015/sep/2...erset-ambulance

Carol Read Nov 11, 2015

There is also the benefit of going out to a wider community via social media.  Understand what we can learn from other countries and industries.  How can we apply the knowledge of a health community that has no choice, but to manage care via tech?  Great work in collating frugal innovation in health care that could be replicated in our NHS system.  Essentially using tech to solve problems, yet not forgetting that tech is only a means to an end.  Important to connect people and use hearts and minds.  

Janet Wildman Nov 20, 2015

It is fantastic that we are now thinking about connecting communities using technology and building on sound engagement principles. Hearts and minds is important in terms of the system being more human as more than anything people look for relationships, whether this is on social media or in person. There is a huge fall out position when we start with a genuine principle and this gets compromised in decisions made about patient needs and choices.This is when the system falls in on itself and begins to lack credibility.

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